Luwero District Leaders Trained on Peacebuilding, Mediation and Leadership.

The Peace Centre organized a 5-day training from 19th to 23rd April 2021 for Luwero District Leaders to enhance their skills in peacebuilding, leadership, mediation and understand the different frameworks for women’s participation in leadership and peacebuilding. The training brought together 35 leaders (30 women, 1 woman with a physical disability and 4 men) district and sub-county councilors from the subcounties of Kamira, Kalagala, Bombo, Katikamu, Luwero, Zirobwe, Kikyusa, Ndejje, Wobulenzi Town Council, Nyimbwa, Luwero Town Council and Butuntumula.

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Increasing Women and Youth’s Participation in Peacebuilding and Leadership in Lira and Soroti.

The Peace Centre conducted a six day’s training for 80 cultural leaders and district technical administrative staff from Soroti and Lira district (40 per district) with the main areas of focus being; mediation and negotiation, conflict analysis and leadership among the selected leaders. Cultural leaders play a key role in refining norms to enhance women’s participation in decision making and outlaw negative practices that deter the progress of women. The training contributes to ongoing efforts to strengthen women’s effective and meaningful participation in the formal and informal peace building processes. Read More “Increasing Women and Youth’s Participation in Peacebuilding and Leadership in Lira and Soroti.”

Peacebuilding and Leadership trainings in Soroti and Lira Districts

Women’s participation in decision making, in peacebuilding and post-conflict recovery processes (in disarmament, reintegration, security sector reform, economic recovery programs, humanitarian response, legal, judicial and electoral processes) in Uganda is markedly low, particularly at the local level.

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Now and the Future Gender Equality, Peace and Security in a COVID-19 World – Uganda Briefing

The Peace Centre, with the support of Womankind Worldwide and Gender
Action for Peace and Security (GAPS), undertook research in Uganda to provide in-depth gender-sensitive conflict analysis to help the international community and governments develop short- and long-term programmes and response frameworks that address the impact of COVID-19 and future pandemics, crises and shocks. Read More “Now and the Future Gender Equality, Peace and Security in a COVID-19 World – Uganda Briefing”

End of Project Learning and Sharing workshop on Promoting Women’s Effective Participation in Peace Building in Uganda

On the 29th of March 2021, The Peace Centre hosted an end of project learning and sharing stakeholder workshop in line with the project “Promoting women’s effective participation in peacebuilding in Uganda”. This project was implemented with the support of UN Women in Yumbe, Adjumani and Kotido districts.

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Grassroots Women Peacebuilders Join the Generation Equality Forum

Women Peacebuilders from Yumbe District with support from the Peace Centre, were able to join the Generation Equality Forum and preparatory workshop discussion. This was a part of Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)65 pre–Generation Equality Mexico Forum workshop that highlighted key discussions for the meaningful participation of women and youth peacebuilders in the Generation Equality Forum. Catherine Kwanje, a Peacebuilder from South Sudan living in Bidibidi Refugee settlement used the forum to share highlights on the need to ensure that women who are displaced by conflict are included in peace processes in their country of origin.

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Meet Our Partner- Teso Women Peace Activists

This quarter, we shine a light on Teso Women Peace Activists (TEWPA), a women-led organisation taking the lead to advance peace, resolve conflict, build tolerance and justice, in the Teso Region.

About TEWPA: Formed in 2001 by Cecilia Engole following her participation in the Isis-WICCE Institute to respond to the challenges that women and girls face during and after conflicts.  Teso Women Peace Activists (TEWPA), designs peace building and conflict resolution projects/programs that are issue based; and organize focused peace building training for TOTs in communities, for sustainability and as an effort to create lasting peace. TEWPA’s focus is peacebuilding, conflict transformation, democratization and human rights. Read More “Meet Our Partner- Teso Women Peace Activists”

National Feedback Meeting to Define Strategies For Reduction of Conflict And Violence in Uganda.

The Peace Centre in partnership with the Ministry of Internal Affairs’ Conflict Early Warning and Early Response system (CEWERU) convened a two day feedback meeting from 10th- 11th March with the National Steering Committee to share early warning reports from the Peace Committees in Kotido, Yumbe and Adjumani and discuss effective and early response to prevent and mitigate conflicts in Uganda. The feedback meeting will be used in laying of strategies and actions for reduction of conflict and violence in Uganda.

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Peace Is Possible with Refugee Women in the Lead

By Diana Oroma

“I used to see conflicts happening in my community but I was silent about it because I didn’t know I had the power to influence change and contribute to peace Janet Ayoo Kelly declares.

Janet Ayoo Kelly, aged 28 years is a  first time refugee living in Maaji III refugee settlement, Adjumani district in West Nile, Uganda. In July 2016, she fled her hometown, Magwi in South Sudan with her first child who was 2 years old at the time. 

However, the situation upon arriving in Uganda was very difficult. “We left all the resources we had worked hard to gain and fled with nothing  I had hoped to settle down and rebuild my life”she recalls. She is part of a group that makes bed sheets and tablecloths a source of income for their families. Janet is also now the secretary for the Adjumani Women Peace Mediators Network.

In December 2019, Janet was one of 156 women leaders from Kotido, Yumbe and Adjumani districts trained on peacebuilding and reconciliation by the Peace Centre with the support of UN Women. Following the training, the women leaders formed Women Peace Mediators Networks.

In Maaji III refugee settlement, the women peace mediators developed  a community action plan to ensure their participation in peace building right from their homes to the wider community. Since then, women peace mediators have identified, reported and mediated 300 conflict incidents including conflict between refugee and host communities and gender-based violence specifically early marriages that led to withdrawal of girls from schools.   

In February 2020, the women peace mediators met again in Nyumanzi settlement to discuss their peacebuilding efforts and learn from experiences in Adjumani, Yumbe and Kotido. Janet learnt of the work that her  fellow peace mediators were doing in their communities .  She was touched by their stories such as the case involving a young girl form a poor family whose father was forcing her to get married to an elderly rich man who lives in America. The mediators engaged the girl’s family, who abandoned the idea and asked the women to pay for her school fees since they wanted her in school. The women peace mediators then referred the girl to an organization for a scholarship.

Janet also recalls the stories from Kotido where women were mediating large scale conflicts., the The women peace mediators had convened 14 peace dialogues resolve the conflict characterised by rampant cattle raids, illegal guns owned by civilians, food insecurity, sexual and gender based violence against women and girls. 

On 10th May 2020,  a small disagreement among five Nuer and Dinka youth in Maaji II refugee settlement  escalated into a violent tribal conflict leaving two young men  dead. Janet was spurred to action. 

“As women peace mediators we realized that the situation was getting out of hand. The situation was very tense, with women and children running up and down. Immediately we gathered together to agree on what to do. We informed the Peace Centre who guided us. We then made a phone call to the refugee settlement commandant asking him urgently to call the police to intervene” Janet recounts.

The Resident District Commissioner (RDC), Refugee Desk Office, and District Police Commander immediately responded by deploying police to calm the situation. Janet and the other women peace mediators also took further action.“We rescued the children from the two families who were being attacked for having started the fights and kept them in a safe place“Together with other leaders in Maaji we continued comforting the family that had lost their son and the one whose son was missing and later found dead. We convinced the families  not to get involved in the fight and keep away from revenge as it would only cause more harm”she narrates. 

Twelve days later, on 22nd May 2020 The Peace Centre convened a peace mediation dialogue in Maaji with key leaders including the RDC, District chairperson LC 5, District Vice Chairperson LC 5, District Peace Committee, Office of the Prime Minister, UNHCR, Lutheran World Federation, Refugee Law Project, Religious, Cultural, political leaders and the Adjumani women peace mediators. The dialogue discussed the conflict situation, identified the triggers and agreed on specific actions to take to ensure conflict indicators are reported to the police and other duty bearers before they escalate. 

During the mediation dialogue, the women peace mediators identified the dark hot spots where the violent youth were hiding such as the banana plantation which was acting as their habitat. Janet and the mediators also made specific demands. “We wrote to the Office of the Prime Minister requesting for security lights in the settlement blocks where the youths were hiding to chase and beat women moving to access the health centre at night. I was personally affected by this. I gave birth on the way because I was afraid to pass at the dark spot alone at night when labor started. The lights were installed” she shares.

The women peace mediators continued their work in a follow up mediation dialogue w on 1st July 2020 where conflict early warning indicators were presented to the leaders for redress. 

“For sustainable peace in the settlement we continued to engage with the youth and their families by encouraging them to keep calm and sensitizing them about the consequences of violent actions to their lives and families”, Janet narrates. She explains how the work of the women peace mediators brought positive changes, “we continued to monitor  conflict early warning indicators and shared with the leaders for their action. For example some youth were spotted in the evenings with walking sticks. Others were seen holding isolated meetings in the local languages. Each tribe stopped their members from crossing where the other tribes live, which kept people in fear. “I am celebrating my breakthrough because of the hard work. I believe that peace is possible with women at the lead. I am now seeing friendship being nurtured again between the Nuer and Dinka youths. They have started having friendly football matches again.

“My skills have doubled. I can now analyze the conflicts and participate in peace building more effectively.  I used to see conflicts happening in my community but I was silent about it because I didn’t know I had the power to influence change and contribute to peace,” Janet says, reflecting on her growth as a leader and a peace builder. I am very grateful to the Peace Centre and UN Women for the skills I obtained. I’m proud to be a peace mediator in my community” says Janet.

Celebrating Women’s day in a COVID-19 World

By Evelyn Birungi

This Monday, we celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women on International Women’s Day(IWD). Marked annually on March 8th, IWD is one of the most important days of the year to: celebrate women’s achievements, raise awareness about women’s equality, lobby for accelerated gender parity, fundraise for female-focused charities. This year, IWD is being celebrated under the theme “Women in leadership achieving an equal future in a COVID-19 world” celebrates the remarkable efforts by women to shape a more equitable future after COVID-19. Read More “Celebrating Women’s day in a COVID-19 World”

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